Walgreens Fires Employee Who Refuses To Sell Plan B Because It Violates His Religious Beliefs

atheists

Being religious in this country is really hard, just as Jesus predicted it would be. After all, there is so much bigotry, ignorance and hate to spread, so much discriminating, judging and pissing on people to do, so many rights to take away and so much damage to be done to reason and sanity – yet so little time – even in Biblical terms.

Case in point, “Dr.” Philip Hall, a Walgreens pharmacist of six years who was fired at a Walgreens store in Jamestown, Tennessee because he, a Baptist with deep religious convictions blah blah blah, refused to compromise said religious beliefs (which his attorneys assure us are protected under the US Constitution that was clearly written by the Founding Fathers and the Twelve Apostles)  by selling Plan B, also known as the “morning after pill” to patients, because selling an “abortion-inducing drug”, as the Christian Newswire is erroneously calling Plan B, was allegedly “in violation of his constitutionally and statutorily protected right to freedom of religion.”

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Ok so now that we all had a good laugh at the expense of Mr. Hall’s (and his attorneys’) hilarious assertions (boy they must be giving away law licenses these days),  let us return back to fact-based reality and remember the following:

1) Plan B is not an abortion-inducing pill.

Repeat after me: Plan B is not an abortion-inducing pill.

One more for the cheap seats: Plan B is not an abortion-inducing pill. 

Plan B is an emergency contraceptive preventing ovulation or fertilization and thus inhibiting implantation. It is not effective once the process of implantation has begun. As in, it will not induce abortion. That is what RU-486 is for. Not Plan B.

Dr. Hall appears then to be against contraception, which is strange because I am sure he had to dispense contraceptives of all kind. If not and he really thinks Plan B induces abortion, then, quite frankly, he needs to have his medical license revoked and not be a pharmacist. He may, however, consider a career in the church business.

2) Religious organizations wish to fire people left and right because they don’t believe. Yet here they are complaining that they are being treated unjustly and violated for their religious beliefs and how that is totally unfair. So which is it then? You can’t have it both ways. Or you can, especially if you are a contemptuous hypocrite who believes that the freedom to believe what one wants should only apply to religious people who’d like to impose their beliefs on everyone, and to no one else – especially not to lowly, misguided, god-less atheists whom the gates of hell are anxiously awaiting.

3) “Dr.” Hall works for a private company and the company’s rules dictate the terms of his employment as well as obligations contained therein. If he doesn’t like them, he doesn’t have to work for them. Simple as that.

At any rate, can we stop accommodating religious people? Fuck them. I am tired of calls to accommodate their backwards, harmful beliefs under the guise of “fair play” and “respect” for their beliefs. No one is under any obligation to respect the beliefs of religious people. We have to acknowledge that they exist but we are not obliged to respect them.

Respect denotes “a feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities, or achievements.” There is nothing I particularly admire about religious people and religion – qualitatively or otherwise – other than its immense ability to spread mass-delusion and ignorance until the bitter end (although I will acknowledge that when religion and religious people are not busy fucking up someone’s life, the tenets surrounding religious belief certainly create all sorts of food for hilarious musings).

Yes, the government may not persecute them or deny them their basic civil rights because of their privately held beliefs but other than that they are not owed  anything.

Religious people are not owed employment and understanding and embracing of their beliefs. Society doesn’t owe them anything, especially if what religious people think they are owed and entitled to is harmful on so many levels to people in a real, tangible manner.

“Dr.” Hall deserved to be kicked out on his ears because he was unprofessional, because he doesn’t know that Plan B is not an abortion pill and because society does not owe him accommodation in the form of employment, of his personal beliefs – especially when those personal beliefs interfere with other peoples’ rights and prerogatives.

This is not a case of wrongful termination. This is just another case of a religious person whose actions harm society playing the victim and whining discrimination because those who have been subject to the religious person’s abuses are pushing back, refusing to become collateral damage on the religious person’s road to salvation by an imaginary figure.

Frankly the fact that they may exist is already one concession too many in my opinion.

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